Compassion • Competence • Character
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Welcome to the Green Valley Fire District

Our organization values the relationship we have with our communities and works hard to ensure we don’t violate the trust or confidence you have placed in us.

As our customer, we strive to exceed your expectations with every encounter we have.  Your input is important to our success, and we value your feedback.  My contact information is listed below.  Please let me know when we exceed your expectations, or if you have suggestions on how we can continue to improve our service delivery.

Chuck Wunder, MSL, EFO, CFO

Fire Chief

cwunder@gvfire.org

Effective March 16, 2020
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Notes of Special Interest

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Firewise – Reducing Residential Wildfire Risks

What are the primary threats to homes during a wildfire?

Sawmill Fire 2017

Research around home destruction vs. home survival in wildfires point to embers and small flames as the main way that the majority of homes ignite in wildfires. Embers are burning pieces of airborne wood and/or vegetation that can be carried more than a mile through the wind can cause spot fires and ignite homes, debris and other objects.

Listed below are methods for homeowners to prepare their homes to withstand ember attacks and minimize the likelihood of flames or surface fire touching the home or any attachments.

VEGETATION MANAGEMENT

1. HOME IGNITION ZONES – Limiting the amount of flammable vegetation, choosing fire-resistant building materials and construction techniques, along with periodic exterior maintenance in the three home ignition zones – increases the chances your home will survive a wildfire when exposed to embers and/or a surface fire.

2. LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE – To reduce ember ignitions and fire spread, trim branches that overhang the home, porch and deck and prune branches of large trees up to (depending on their height) 6 to 10 feet from the ground. Remove plants containing resins, oils and waxes and ensure mulches close to the house are non-combustible options like crushed stone and gravel. Maintain vegetation annually.

FIRE RESISTIVE CONSTRUCTION

3. ROOFING AND VENTS – Class A fire-rated roofing products offer the best protection. Inspect shingles or roof tiles and replace or repair those that are loose or missing to prevent ember penetration. Roof and attic vents should be screened to prevent ember entry.

4. DECKS AND PORCHES – Never store flammable materials underneath decks or porches. Remove dead vegetation and debris from under decks/porches and between deck board joints.

5. SIDING AND WINDOWS – Embers can collect in small nooks and crannies and ignite combustible materials; radiant heat from flames can crack windows. Use fire-resistant siding such as brick, fiber-cement, plaster or stucco and dual-pane tempered glass windows.

6. EMERGENCY RESPONDER ACCESS – Ensure your home and neighborhood has legible and clearly marked street names and numbers.

BE PREPARED

Develop, discuss and practice an emergency action plan with everyone in your home. Include details for pets, large animals and livestock. Know two ways out of your neighborhood and have a pre-designated meeting place. Always evacuate if you feel it’s unsafe to stay – don’t wait to receive an emergency notification if you feel threatened from the fire.

Green Valley Fire District

Compassion, Competence and Character

The men and women of the Green Valley Fire District strive to provide the best possible service to the Greater Green Valley Community. We want to hear from you when are folks go above and beyond what you might expect.  And yes, we also want to hear from you when we don’t meet your expectations.  Our folks take pride in what they do and your comments go  a long way in saying thanks and also making us better.  Here is a recent comment received.

“On February 12, 2020, I tripped in my home and fell on the tile floor of my dining room, knocked myself out and sustained a cut along side my eyebrow. My husband called the Green Valley Fire Department; after which two EMTs arrived. When the EMTs arrived, they got me into a sitting position, checked my vitals, and wrapped the injury. They advised that I was fine but needed to go to the hospital emergency room for stiches, which we did.

I regret that we did not get the EMTs names. They were professional, yet very kind and alleviated my fright.

We are writing to say Thank You, for the promptness of their arrival, their expertise and kindness. Please thank them for taking care of me.

Sincerely,

Judith and Don DeBelle”

Come Join Our Fire Corps Team

Are you looking for something fun to do while helping your fellow Green Valley neighbors stay safe in their homes? Well Fire Corps may be just what you’re looking for!

The continued growth of our wildly successful; smoke alarm and battery replacement programs, rapid entry lock-box installation, desert pest relocation, administrative support for the Fire District, and community fall prevention services have created the need to find more men and women volunteers.

Fire Corps volunteers provide non-emergency support to the Green Valley Fire District saving GVFD over $200,000 each year and have a great time doing it.

Volunteers receive extensive classroom and field training in all functions. There are positions available that will cater to your specific interests and skills. Join our outstanding cadre of friendly, community minded volunteers and help keep Green Valley safe.

To join, call the Green Valley Fire District Community Services Division at 520-625 9438. We would like to talk to you!

Green Valley Fire Corps Community Services has been suspended until further notice!!!

Green Valley Fire District is doing it’s part to “Slow the Spread” of the COVID-19 coronavirus during these difficult times. We value our volunteers and as this group of dedicated individuals are part of the high-risk population, we have elected to suspend all Fire Corps related activities and services.

This suspension includes the community service of replacing batteries in smoke alarms and installing new ones when needed. If you are a member of the Smoke Alarm / Battery Replacement Program, we will contact you when our service is up and running again. The popular “Lock Box” program has also been suspended until we believe it is safe for our volunteers to once again serve the community with this service.

Also, all administrative services will not be activated so the Fire Corps Office will not be answering phones or returning calls.

Other programs that the Fire Corps usually handle such as the chirping smoke alarm or the desert pest removal service will be accomplished by our firefighters. If you need these services please call 629-9200.

We apologize for the inconvenience this may create for you and ask that you help us by taking care of yourself and practice proper precautions to remain healthy and safe. Our firefighters remain ready to serve in case of emergency. We are in this together!

If you are looking for a fun, exciting career

The Green Valley Fire District seeks to hire employees who share our desire to provide the best possible services to our residents, businesses, community, and our fellow team members.  Our work environment supports teamwork, diversity, and encourages our employees to increase their knowledge, skills, and abilities through training and development.  Please submit an Interest Form so that we can contact you when our next process opens.   Thank You for considering a career with the Green Valley Fire District.

While you’re here, check out what is happening regionally

Click to visit the Pima Chiefs website
A Regional Partnership Collaborating to Lead Pima County’s Emergency Services

The Pima Fire Chiefs Association is made up of members, associate members, and regional partners who are working collaboratively to lead Pima County’s emergency services.

Following a recently completed strategic outline, the Association is focused on stronger leadership, increased engagement, better defined mission and purpose, increased collaboration amongst its membership, and improved mentoring opportunities within the Association.

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