Compassion • Competence • Character

Welcome to the
Green Valley Fire District

Our organization values the relationship we have with our communities and works hard to ensure we don’t violate the trust or confidence you have placed in us.

As our customer, we strive to exceed your expectations with every encounter we have.  Your input is important to our success, and we value your feedback.  My contact information is listed below.  Please let me know when we exceed your expectations, or if you have suggestions on how we can continue to improve our service delivery.

Chuck Wunder, MSL, EFO, CFO

Fire Chief

cwunder@gvfire.org

What’s Your Plan in Case of Fire?

Your ability to get out of your home during a fire depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the smoke alarm sounds. A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors.

Escape planning tips

Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes.  Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm.

A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code® requires interconnected smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.

When you walk through your plan, check to make sure the escape routes are clear and doors and windows can be opened easily.

Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor’s house, a light post, mailbox, or stop sign) a safe distance in front of your home where everyone can meet after they’ve escaped. Make sure to mark the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.

Go outside to see if your street number is clearly visible from the road. If not, paint it on the curb or install house numbers to ensure that responding emergency personnel can find your home.

Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor’s home or a cellular phone once safely outside.

If there are infants, older adults, or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency. Assign a backup person too, in case the designee is not home during the emergency.

If windows or doors in your home have security bars, make sure that the bars have emergency release devices inside so that they can be opened immediately in an emergency. Emergency release devices won’t compromise your security – but they will increase your chances of safely escaping a home fire.

Be fully prepared for a real fire: when a smoke alarm sounds, get out immediately.

Once you’re out, stay out! Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. If someone is missing, inform the fire department dispatcher when you call. Firefighters have the skills and equipment to perform rescues.

Put your plan to the test

  • Practice your home fire escape plan twice a year, making the drill as realistic as possible.
  • Make arrangements in your plan for anyone in your home who has a disability.
  • Allow children to master fire escape planning and practice before holding a fire drill at night when they are sleeping. The objective is to practice, not to frighten, so telling children there will be a drill before they go to bed can be as effective as a surprise drill.
  • It’s important to determine during the drill whether children and others can readily waken to the sound of the smoke alarm. If they fail to awaken, make sure that someone is assigned to wake them up as part of the drill and in a real emergency situation.
  • If your home has two floors, every family member (including children) must be able to escape from the second-floor rooms. Escape ladders can be placed in or near windows to provide an additional escape route. Review the manufacturer’s instructions carefully so you’ll be able to use a safety ladder in an emergency. Practice setting up the ladder from a first-floor window to make sure you can do it correctly and quickly. Children should only practice with a grown-up, and only from a first-story window. Store the ladder near the window, in an easily accessible location. You don’t want to have to search for it during a fire.
  • Always choose the escape route that is safest – the one with the least amount of smoke and heat – but be prepared to escape under toxic smoke if necessary. When you do your fire drill, everyone in the family should practice getting low and going under the smoke to your exit.
  • Closing doors on your way out slows the spread of fire, giving you more time to safely escape.
  • In some cases, smoke or fire may prevent you from exiting your home or apartment building. To prepare for an emergency like this, practice “sealing yourself in for safety” as part of your home fire escape plan. Close all doors between you and the fire. Use duct tape or towels to seal the door cracks and cover air vents to keep smoke from coming in. If possible, open your windows at the top and bottom so fresh air can get in. Call the fire department to report your exact location. Wave a flashlight or light-colored cloth at the window to let the fire department know where you are located.

Clear Your Escape Routes

Items that block doors and windows in your home could keep you from escaping in the event of a home fire. And that could mean the difference between life and death. So unblock your exits today! Key to your family’s safety is planning and practicing a home fire escape plan twice a year. Start by identifying two escape routes out of each room, if possible, then make sure that each of those escape routes can be used safely by everyone.

For more information on how to prevent winter fires, visit www.usfa.fema.gov/winter

 And  www.nfpa.org/winter.

Green Valley Fire District

Compassion, Competence and Character

The men and women of the Green Valley Fire District strive to provide the best possible service to the Greater Green Valley Community. We want to hear from you when are folks go above and beyond what you might expect.  And yes, we also want to hear from you when we don’t meet your expectations.  Our folks take pride in what they do and your comments go  a long way in saying thanks and also making us better.  Here are some recent comments concerning the COVID Vaccination Program at the SCVRH.

I received my Covid vaccine shot yesterday at Santa Cruz Hospital. I wanted to thank the planners and all the volunteers that were working yesterday. The event was very well planned and organized. The workers were all great, friendly and helpful. The process went very smooth and was the first time I enjoyed getting a shot. lol”
 –Bill Bradway–
 
“I received my Covid 19 vaccination yesterday at the Hospital on I-19 Frontage Rd. I wanted to let you know that I was SO impressed with the organization of the event and the staff that helped make it a success. Thank you GVFD and the Sheriff’s Dept and the Nurses that gave the injections. GOOD JOB!”
–Jean Cartier–
 
“We would like to thank you all so much for the caring, efficient, and professional way in which you guided and delivered our first COVID 19 injection last Friday at the GV Regional Hospital. Your organized process should be a blueprint for any COVID point of care in the state. Again, thanks for being there for all of us. (One week later – doing just fine!)”
–Paul and Sheila Forsyth–

Come Join Our Fire Corps Team

Are you looking for something fun to do while helping your fellow Green Valley neighbors stay safe in their homes? Well Fire Corps may be just what you’re looking for!

The continued growth of our wildly successful; smoke alarm and battery replacement programs, rapid entry lock-box installation, desert pest relocation, administrative support for the Fire District, and community fall prevention services have created the need to find more men and women volunteers.

To join, call the Green Valley Fire District Community Services Division at 520-625 9438. We would like to talk to you!

Volunteers receive extensive classroom and field training in all functions. There are positions available that will cater to your specific interests and skills. Join our outstanding cadre of friendly, community minded volunteers and help keep Green Valley safe.

Fire Corps volunteers provide non-emergency support to the Green Valley Fire District saving GVFD over $200,000 each year and have a great time doing it.

Green Valley Fire Corps Community Services has been suspended until further notice!!!

Green Valley Fire District is doing it’s part to “Slow the Spread” of the COVID-19 coronavirus during these difficult times. We value our volunteers and as this group of dedicated individuals are part of the high-risk population, we have elected to suspend all Fire Corps related activities and services.

This suspension includes the community service of replacing batteries in smoke alarms and installing new ones when needed. If you are a member of the Smoke Alarm / Battery Replacement Program, we will contact you when our service is up and running again. The popular “Lock Box” program has also been suspended until we believe it is safe for our volunteers to once again serve the community with this service.

Also, all administrative services will not be activated so the Fire Corps Office will not be answering phones or returning calls.

Other programs that the Fire Corps usually handle such as the chirping smoke alarm or the desert pest removal service will be accomplished by our firefighters. If you need these services please call 629-9200.

We apologize for the inconvenience this may create for you and ask that you help us by taking care of yourself and practice proper precautions to remain healthy and safe. Our firefighters remain ready to serve in case of emergency. We are in this together!

If you are looking for a fun, exciting career

The Green Valley Fire District seeks to hire employees who share our desire to provide the best possible services to our residents, businesses, community, and our fellow team members.  Our work environment supports teamwork, diversity, and encourages our employees to increase their knowledge, skills, and abilities through training and development.  Please submit an Interest Form so that we can contact you when our next process opens.   Thank You for considering a career with the Green Valley Fire District.

While you’re here, check out what is happening regionally

Click to visit the Pima Chiefs website
A Regional Partnership Collaborating to Lead Pima County’s Emergency Services

The Pima Fire Chiefs Association is made up of members, associate members, and regional partners who are working collaboratively to lead Pima County’s emergency services.

Following a recently completed strategic outline, the Association is focused on stronger leadership, increased engagement, better defined mission and purpose, increased collaboration amongst its membership, and improved mentoring opportunities within the Association.

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