Green Valley Fire District Green Valley Fire District

Compassion • Competence • Character

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Welcome to the Green Valley Fire District

Our organization values the relationship we have with our communities and works hard to ensure we don’t violate the trust or confidence you have placed in us.

As our customer, we strive to exceed your expectations with every encounter we have.  Your input is important to our success, and we value your feedback.  My contact information is listed below.  Please let me know when we exceed your expectations, or if you have suggestions on how we can continue to improve our service delivery.

 

Chuck Wunder, MSL, EFO, CFO

Fire Chief

cwunder@gvfire.org

Do You Have an Escape Plan if Fire Breaks Out?

Basic fire escape planning
Items that block doors and windows in your home could keep you from escaping in the event of a home fire. And that could mean the difference between life and death. So unblock your exits today! Key to your family’s safety is planning and practicing a home fire escape plan twice a year. Start by identifying two escape routes out of each room, if possible, then make sure that each of those escape routes can be used safely by everyone.

 

Download the “Clear Your Escape Routes” brochure in English (PDF) or Spanish (PDF).

  • Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes.  Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm. For easy planning, download NFPA’s escape planning grid(PDF). This is a great way to get children involved in fire safety in a non-threatening way.
  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code® requires interconnected smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Everyone in the household must understand the escape plan. When you walk through your plan, check to make sure the escape routes are clear and doors and windows can be opened easily.
  • Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor’s house, a light post, mailbox, or stop sign) a safe distance in front of your home where everyone can meet after they’ve escaped. Make sure to mark the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.
  • Go outside to see if your street number is clearly visible from the road. If not, paint it on the curb or install house numbers to ensure that responding emergency personnel can find your home.
  • Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor’s home or a cellular phone once safely outside.
  • If there are infants, older adults, or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency. Assign a backup person too, in case the designee is not home during the emergency.
  • If windows or doors in your home have security bars, make sure that the bars have emergency release devices inside so that they can be opened immediately in an emergency. Emergency release devices won’t compromise your security – but they will increase your chances of safely escaping a home fire.
  • Tell guests or visitors to your home about your family’s fire escape plan. When staying overnight at other people’s homes, ask about their escape plan. If they don’t have a plan in place, offer to help them make one. This is especially important when children are permitted to attend “sleepovers” at friends’ homes. See NFPA’s “Sleepover fire safety for kids” fact sheet.
  • Be fully prepared for a real fire: when a smoke alarm sounds, get out immediately. Residents of high-rise and apartment buildingsmay be safer “defending in place.”

 

Putting your plan to the test

  • Practice your home fire escape plan twice a year, making the drill as realistic as possible.
  • Make arrangements in your plan for anyone in your home who has a disability.
  • Allow children to master fire escape planning and practice before holding a fire drill at night when they are sleeping. The objective is to practice, not to frighten, so telling children there will be a drill before they go to bed can be as effective as a surprise drill.
  • It’s important to determine during the drill whether children and others can readily waken to the sound of the smoke alarm. If they fail to awaken, make sure that someone is assigned to wake them up as part of the drill and in a real emergency situation.
  • If your home has two floors, every family member (including children) must be able to escape from the second floor rooms. Escape ladders can be placed in or near windows to provide an additional escape route. Review the manufacturer’s instructions carefully so you’ll be able to use a safety ladder in an emergency. Practice setting up the ladder from a first floor window to make sure you can do it correctly and quickly. Children should only practice with a grown-up, and only from a first-story window. Store the ladder near the window, in an easily accessible location. You don’t want to have to search for it during a fire.
  • Always choose the escape route that is safest – the one with the least amount of smoke and heat – but be prepared to escape under toxic smoke if necessary. When you do your fire drill, everyone in the family should practice getting low and going under the smoke to your exit.
  • Closing doors on your way out slows the spread of fire, giving you more time to safely escape.

In some cases, smoke or fire may prevent you from exiting your home or apartment building. To prepare for an emergency like this, practice “sealing yourself in for safety” as part of your home fire escape plan. Close all doors between you and the fire. Use duct tape or towels to seal the door cracks and cover air vents to keep smoke from coming in. If possible, open your windows at the top and bottom so fresh air can get in. Call the fire department to report your exact location. Wave a flashlight or light-colored cloth at the window to let the fire department know where you are located.

Green Valley Fire District - Compassion, Competence and Character

We like to post comments that we receive that reflect the service our members provide to our community.  It is our hope, and overarching goal, that we provide the best, most compassionate service possible in each and every call for service we respond to.

“My husband fell several times and I was forced to call 911 for assistance in getting him up. Capt Dan offered to take him to the hospital at 2 a.m., but husband refused. Dan gave me the handout re: Urgent Care in your Home and suggested that I call for an appointment.   I did just that!   Adrianne called and came out in just three days – over a holiday weekend.

I cannot imagine more professional and encouraging medical contacts than Adrianne and Austin who came to our home to evaluate my husband after the series of falls. Adrianne prescribed a number of lab (blood) tests which my husband took within a few days. She encouraged him to see his primary, which we were able to do quickly thru the Patient Portal at Pima Heart. Changing his B/P meds and diuretic corrected his light-headedness. Adrianne’s suggestion of additional water and Ensure also helped.

Adrianne’s professional help was exactly what we needed when there was no way I could talk my husband into the car to take him to urgent care or the emergency room.

What a comfort she was! We are in much better circumstances now thanks to her! ”

SIDNEY GEMLICH

Come Join Our Fire Corps Team

Are you looking for something fun to do while helping your fellow Green Valley neighbors stay safe in their homes? Well Fire Corps may be just what you’re looking for!

The continued growth of our wildly successful; smoke alarm and battery replacement programs, rapid entry lock-box installation, desert pest relocation, administrative support for the Fire District, and community fall prevention services have created the need to find more men and women volunteers.

Fire Corps volunteers provide non-emergency support to the Green Valley Fire District saving GVFD over $200,000 each year and have a great time doing it.

Volunteers receive extensive classroom and field training in all functions. There are positions available that will cater to your specific interests and skills. Join our outstanding cadre of friendly, community minded volunteers and help keep Green Valley safe.

To join, call the Green Valley Fire District Community Services Division at 520-625 9438. We would like to talk to you!

Learn More

fire-corps

 

If you are looking for a fun, exciting career

the Green Valley Fire District invites you to take a deeper look at us and apply today!  Fill out an Interest Card under the “About” link, then go to “Employment”.  We’ll contact you when the next process begins.

Job Interest Form
Thank You for considering the Green Valley Fire District!
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